Children and the Law Posts

Distinguishing ‘Incorrigibility’ From ‘Transient Immaturity’: Risk Assessment in the Context of Sentencing/Resentencing Evaluations for Juvenile Homicide Offenders

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n two recent cases, the United States Supreme Court abolished mandatory juvenile life without parole (LWOP; Miller v. Alabama, 2012) and held that the ban applies retroactively (Montgomery v. Louisiana, 2016). Pointedly, the Court suggested that juveniles should only be sentenced to LWOP when they are ‘incorrigible’ or ‘irreparably corrupt.’

Juveniles in Criminal Proceedings

This paper is of a combined character; summary and research, as it contains comparisons and research in a critical way, so it includes content and important psychological aspects of criminal actions that lead the juvenile person to conflict with the law, including factors which directly or indirectly affect this category of society to be involved in criminal activity.